How is child support calculated?

Florida Statute 61.30 governs child support. The statute details what amounts are the full obligation for a parent when you look at combined monthly net income of both parties. For example, if the mother and father earn, after taxes are deducted, an income of $2,000 per month, the total child support obligation is $442 for one child. The table details amounts up to 6 children.

In paternity and divorce cases, the Circuit Court typically handles establishing a child support obligation considering the parties' parenting plan and schedule. In these Circuit Court cases, both parties' gross incomes (before taxes and deductions) are looked at. Then, allowable deductions, including dependency exemptions, the parents' health insurance payments, the parents' mandatory retirement contributions, etc., are taken from the gross income. After, we are left with both parties' net income (after taxes and deductions). The Court considers if either party is paying for the children's child care expenses, uncovered medical and health expenses on an ongoing basis, and the children's health insurance. The Court also uses what's called a "gross up" method to account for overnights of the parties. At the bottom of the calculation, we are left with both parties' child support obligations.

This blog post is informational and not intended to provide legal advice in any way whatsoever. This post does not create a relationship between the reader and Bouchard Law, P.A.